“The Myth of Authority”

Image: http://www.zengardner.com

“In short: the political process is designed to dupe the people into cooperating with, and even demanding their own subjugation, and the subjugation of everyone else.

The Myth of Authority

By Ryan Cristian

Guest Contributor, Zen Gardner

“People should not be afraid of their governments; governments should be afraid of their people.”

Contrary to what many people assume, most of the suffering, injustice and conflict in the world is not the result of greed, hatred or intolerance. Instead… Most of man’s inhumanity to man is the result of one particular belief; one irrational superstition which is shared by almost everyone, namely, the belief in authority.

History has taught us that trying to fix the world by way of government always ends in disaster. That in the end the political process empowers the ruling class and no one else. Constitutions don’t fix it. Elections don’t fix it.

Once a position of power is created, it is always the megalomaniacs and sociopaths who will sooner or later, one way or another, get themselves into that position.

Decent people are tricked into believing that it is perfectly acceptable and righteous to control and rob their neighbors, as long as they do it by way of voting in the political process.

Tyrants love it when they can get the people to cheer for their neighbors to be robbed by way of taxation or cheer for their neighbors to be forcibly controlled by way of regulation and legislation.

In short: the political process is designed to dupe the people into cooperating with, and even demanding their own subjugation, and the subjugation of everyone else.

The old notion of the divine right of kings has changed into the divine right of politicians… with similar results.

Hundreds of millions of human beings have been murdered by their own governments. Many millions more have died in government created wars and billions more have been robbed, harassed, terrorized and otherwise forcibly dominated and impressed by ruling classes… Including democratically elected constitutional governments.

To create a huge all-powerful predator, which is what government always is, in the name of stopping predators is simply INSANE.

And then the big powerful thing that you hoped would be a protector and servant of the people, will be an oppressor and exploiter of the people. That is what government has always been and always will be, until the people dare to let go of the superstition of authority.

About the author:

Tim Bryant grew up in a small town in the Midwest, a product of the matrix, caught in the mold of the school, work, family, then die paradigm, until a serious of events changed the direction of his life. This first being college, where he played tennis on scholarship as the only American on the team. This started his awakening only to go through another much deeper phase upon watching the Zeitgeist documentaries, which exposing a hidden world that was unknown to him. This opened up Pandora’s Box, causing him go deep down the rabbit hole into any knowledge he could find, coupled with a 7 month trip around the world. Tim sees the truth movement as the next step in our evolution as a species, and aims to be at the forefront the movement.

You can connect with Tim at:

Website: new.thelastamericanvagabond.com
Facebook: facebook.com/TheLastAmericanVagabond

Source: The Myth of Authority – Zen Gardner

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13 thoughts on ““The Myth of Authority”

  1. Pingback: “The Myth of Authority” | Rifleman III Journal

  2. Pingback: “The Myth of Authority” | zooforyou

  3. This made me realize how profoundly culture can influence how we see the world, Dave. Somehow, I grew up knowing that leadership means responsibility, not status, as does merely being human.We are all responsible to each other, our earth home, and all life. I have an automatic need to resist (and sometimes challenge) those who think authority means they have power over others. Leadership is merely one role among many of equal importance for the well-being and survival of all now and in the future. I guess it’s why I’ve always had trouble in bureaucracies 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Exactly, Carol! Everything we do should ultimately be done for the good of each other, the rest of our brothers and sisters around the world (humanity), and the planet, our home.

    I, too, have always had problems dealing with bureaucracy, and authority. I think from an early age I knew something was wrong with the way this system is set up. But it has taken me all of these years to come to understand why I had that sense at the time.

    It is this illness, this authority, that is destroying all of us and our world. I just hope the majority of us, at some point, can find a way to come together and end this age old curse, before it is too late.

    I read your post today, Carol, and was moved, as I always am. It is this spirit you wrote of that I am speaking of here. I didn’t know how to respond to what you wrote until now.

    Thank you, Carol!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’ve learned that authority is complex. As a supervisor and teacher, most of my staff and many of my students wanted to avoid responsibility for taking the risks involved in “leadership.” They expected, and some actually demanded, that I tell them what to do. I suspect many people don’t want the hassle of taking the responsibility for learning, critical thinking and risking failure that authentic leadership requires.

    I learned that I don’t want positions that fit with people’s notions of status, but I do know that that sense of power, although an illusion with real consequences, can be seductive. I don’t believe these issues will be easy to resolve on a national or global level until people in local communities can learn how to get along without someone in authority telling them what to do…

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  6. Again, Carol, we are in agreement.

    This is why I believe so strongly in small to moderate sized, self-governing/sustaining communities.

    We will all have to learn how to live in this manner once again!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Yes, nothing comes easy, or, at least, nothing worth having!

    On the subject of lyrics, I was watching the weather channel this morning, and a commercial came on playing these lyrics, by another member of the Beatles:

    “…Imagine there’s no countries
    It isn’t hard to do
    Nothing to kill or die for
    And no religion too
    Imagine all the people
    Living life in peace… You,..

    You may say I’m a dreamer
    But I’m not the only one
    I hope someday you’ll join us
    And the world will be as one

    Imagine no possessions
    I wonder if you can
    No need for greed or hunger
    A brotherhood of man
    Imagine all the people
    Sharing all the world… You,..

    You may say I’m a dreamer
    But I’m not the only one
    I hope someday you’ll join us
    And the world will be as one”

    Liked by 1 person

  8. A breath of fresh air, thank you. I often wonder how we will transition from this system because I think it is so far gone that it cannot be fixed. The initial premise behind ceding power over oneself to external authority is inherently flawed. Throughout my life I have tried really hard to adopt the systems of thought that allow me to believe in authority, but it’s so surreal that I can’t maintain the charade for very long. Mostly I try not to mention it. I feel so lucky that I have never been and never will be “acceptable” -it created a crack in the indoctrination process. It has taught me the very skills required to survive without external domination, to welcome freedom and know that I will not fly apart without external control and that I will not disintegrate into immorality without written down laws. The way I see it, the writers of those laws have no inclination towards compliance. Since as young as I can remember, I have wondered about the decoupling of responsibility from power. There’s no way to make it fit into my brain as anything other than a stupid and dangerous delusion.

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  9. So spot on, Robyn!

    You wrote,

    “I feel so lucky that I have never been and never will be “acceptable” -it created a crack in the indoctrination process. It has taught me the very skills required to survive without external domination, to welcome freedom and know that I will not fly apart without external control and that I will not disintegrate into immorality without written down laws.”

    Believe it or not, I can relate to this statement as well, thus the An Outsider’s Sojourn title. It is for different reasons, and I am not implying I have suffered the way you have. Nevertheless, I have never been accepted by most of my race, nor any other. I won’t go into details, because it would sound like whining. And because of this, I have always sensed this is why I have always questioned authority.

    You are so right, Robyn, it is all a scam, a “Stupid and Dangerous delusion”, which was created so the powerful few could control and rule we the majority!

    Thanks again, Robyn!

    I was good to hear from you! And I always look forward to your postings!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I believe it! Thinking about this further overnight, I wonder what a psychologist would say about all this? The main challenge I have with external authority is the requirement to put aside my lived reality to achieve cogency with their stated (or unstated) aims. The rules seem to be based on a view of the world that is inaccessible to me, whether I try and make myself believe it or not. So, like you I think, I go with the reality I can perceive and I educate myself daily to expand the scope of that, to fill in the gaps and illuminate my perspective. Continuous learning. If a person in authority, in government say, would display that kind of openness to their environment, to receive, digest and distill the experiences of those they might serve (the public) – then I might have more space to accept the idea of their governance.

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  11. You wrote,

    “If a person in authority, in government say, would display that kind of openness to their environment, to receive, digest and distill the experiences of those they might serve (the public) – then I might have more space to accept the idea of their governance.”

    Same here, Robyn. But it is evident to me that human beings aren’t capable of representing massive groups of people without becoming the same old tyrant/despot. And among those few who did seek to serve the people, they were either pushed out of the way or assassinated.

    I believe it is massive government (the state) that is the problem. Small self-governing/sustaining communities, yes, but when the people need a “representative”, then the people have given up their individual and collective freedom.

    Thanks, Robyn!

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