“Land for What?”

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…”1,000 years ago, in England, 100% of the bounty from the land was used for the common good but from the time of Henry VIII the public share of surplus revenues from the land reduced from 100% to c.4% by the beginning of the 19th century. To make up for the dwindling public revenues income and other taxes, which penalise enterprise and work, were introduced. Once we became dislocated from the land, the foundations of our civilisation began to erode and we became so traumatised and distracted that we lack the capability to think properly about these issues.”

Land for What?

Published on Monday, 24 October 2016

Friday’s Daily Pickings alighted on Miraculous Abundance, a book by Charles and Perrine Hervé-Gruyer which documents the development of permaculture on their small farm and explains how we can create food abundance through decentralised and de-industrialised agriculture.

Next month in London, there is a weekend of workshops and discussions to explore issues around land, the source of food and life.

Land for What?

A weekend of conversations about land hosted by Community Food Growers Network, Just Space, Landworkers’ Alliance, London Quaker Housing, New Economics Foundation, Radical Housing Network, Shared Assets, London Community Neighbourhood Co-operative, Three Acres And A Cow and Ubele

There is an unfortunate emphasis on Climate Change in the introduction but that shouldn’t detract from the exploration of the importance of land; irrespective of whether the threat of man-made climate change is real of imagined, the imperative to radically change our approach to land and farming is paramount.

All wealth is derived from the land but it has been appropriated by the few denying the rest of us access to our birthright, the means to life. This is a fundamental principle which should underpin our thinking on how to transform the political economy.

The Traumatised Society

In The Traumatised Society Fred Harrison explains how this is a crisis of our civilisation and describes the rise and fall of previous civilisations which allowed the means to life, in terms of land and resources, to be owned and exploited by an elite. He explains how 1,000 years ago, in England, 100% of the bounty from the land was used for the common good but from the time of Henry VIII the public share of surplus revenues from the land reduced from 100% to c.4% by the beginning of the 19th century. To make up for the dwindling public revenues income and other taxes, which penalise enterprise and work, were introduced. Once we became dislocated from the land, the foundations of our civilisation began to erode and we became so traumatised and distracted that we lack the capability to think properly about these issues.

Beneath the radar, there is a growing awareness that climate change hysteria is driven by politics rather than science – we know from where this originates and who is pulling the strings of the political puppets.

Source: Land for what?

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