Capitalism is a Curse: “13,400 of Chicago’s Homeless Had Jobs in 2017, 18,000 Had a College Education”

Also see:

Cruel and Unusual: City Plays ‘Baby Shark’ Song on Loop to Drive Out Homeless People:

Across the United States, rising income inequality and surging homelessness is leading cities to introduce brutal measures meant to drive out people living on the streets. From hostile architecture like unneeded bike racks to “bum-proof” benches and spikes on every surface imaginable, cities large and small are doing all they can to make life literally unlivable for the already unfortunate indigent population left desperate for a bit of rest.

But now, officials in West Palm Beach, Florida, have devised possibly the cruelest means of dissuading the homeless from sleeping on city property: a never-ending loop of obnoxious, weaponized children’s songs including the infamous Baby Shark.

Leah Rockwell, the city’s Parks and Recreation director, told the Palm Beach Post that the goal is to prevent people from sleeping outside of the glass-walled Waterfront Lake Pavilion, a lavish rental banquet facility that can rake in around $240,000 per year from events, according to the Associated Press…

City Announces Cops to Begin Arresting People for Being Homeless in the Wrong Part of Town:

Orange County, CA — The war on homelessness has reached unprecedented heights this week as officials in California announced that they will begin arresting people in certain ares for the sole factor of being homeless. The announcement comes after a series of lawsuits were settled to get a handle on Orange County’s homeless problem.

For the mere act of being homeless in the wrong part of town, cops can now arrest people. Exactly how they will know a person is homeless, remains unclear.

According to a report from Fox 11:

Orange County, Calif., reached a settlement Tuesday that will allow law enforcement to immediately arrest homeless people in certain locations, including the John Wayne Airport, flood control channels and high-risk wilderness areas.

The Orange County Board of Supervisors settled two federal lawsuits filed last year aimed at efforts to clear out hundreds of homeless people who were camped out along the Santa Ana riverbed near Angel Stadium, Los Angeles’s Fox 11 reported.

{Sojourner note: Fuck this country!}

Quote from the following article:

This data shows that anyone can experience homelessness, particularly in a city where rapidly escalating rents in gentrifying neighborhoods have fueled the loss of housing options for lower-income families. It also should debunk common myths that homelessness is a risk only to those who don’t have job, aren’t trying to get an education, or otherwise brought their circumstances on themselves. That’s never been true, and this data proves it again.

Mr and Ms Insouciant and Arrogant America, behold your American Nightmare; where the common man or woman can have a college education, and/or work hard at several jobs, and still end up basically broke and living underneath a bridge in the middle of a Chicago winter. You need to wake up, this isn’t the 1950s, ’60s, or ’70s, this is the new century/millennium of the inbred, Anglo-Zionist pig, whose insane gluttony has no end. And you could be next, so get off of your not so lofty and very insecure perch and start staring reality in the face.

‘The American Dream’ is and has always been the most heinous of all baldfaced lies, since it keeps the people/the suckers, who in reality, have no way to advance ‘upward’, chasing after marsh-gas/fools-gold, while at the same time, padding the pockets of the inbred, capitalist psychopaths who created ‘the American dream’ for this very purpose:

13,400 of Chicago’s Homeless Had Jobs in 2017, 18,000 Had a College Education

By Emma Fiala

A report published on Tuesday by the Chicago Coalition for the Homeless, revealed that 13,400 of the city’s homeless population had jobs in 2017 while another 18,000 had a college education. The report challenges long held stereotypes concerning the homeless that include the false idea that anyone with a steady job or college education is immune from one of life’s most difficult experiences.

After examining 2017 census data, the Chicago Coalition of the Homeless (CCH) found that about 86,000 people experienced homelessness in the city at some point during the year.

The coalition’s policy director, Julie Dworkin, said:

Now we have a way to talk about the full scope of homelessness in Chicago. The point-in-time count doesn’t capture the way most people experience homelessness. Being able to quantify that has really pushed the envelope in Chicago in terms of the city thinking about what resources are necessary to address it.

The CCH report is important in more ways than one. The city of Chicago conducts what is called a point-in-time tally to gauge the number of homeless people living in the city. These tallies produce notoriously inaccurate results as they do not include the population currently “doubled up”—those temporarily residing in the homes of others. For example, the latest tally—from January 2018—showed that more than 5,000 people were living either in shelters or in a location not suitable for human habitation. But according to the Chicago Coalition of the Homeless, four out of five homeless people in the city are “doubled up”—meaning they aren’t counted in the point-in-time tally.

After examining 2017 census data, the Chicago Coalition of the Homeless (CCH) found that about 86,000 people experienced homelessness in the city at some point during the year.

The report notes that Chicago’s increasing housing costs is a contributing factor in the city’s homeless population. According tot he National Low Income Housing Coalition, the “house wage” required to afford a two=bedroom apartment is more than $23 per hour.
Dworkin explained:

This data shows that anyone can experience homelessness, particularly in a city where rapidly escalating rents in gentrifying neighborhoods have fueled the loss of housing options for lower-income families. It also should debunk common myths that homelessness is a risk only to those who don’t have job, aren’t trying to get an education, or otherwise brought their circumstances on themselves. That’s never been true, and this data proves it again.

By Emma Fiala | Creative Commons | TheMindUnleashed.com

Source: 13,400 of Chicago’s Homeless Had Jobs in 2017, 18,000 Had a College Education